More Ahi

Ahi_StirFryI get the feeling you’re all dying for more fresh ahi tuna. Well here it is. For the second of my two amazing tuna steaks, I decided to go even more simple and healthy. Behold, seared ahi with stir fried vegetables. In my wok I stir fried zucchini, then asparagus, then cremini mushrooms (removing each one to a bowl before adding the next). Once all were cooked to my liking, I returned all of them to the wok, added a pressed clove of garlic, a few squirts of Sriracha, and a generous helping of Bragg’s Liquid Aminos (basically soy sauce that is gluten free and packed with protein).

If you read my last post, you know that I seared both steaks at the same time, used one right away, and kept another wrapped tightly in the fridge for later use. Both recipes I’ve shared would work equally well with either freshly cooked or chilled from the previous day. Totally up to you. I confess that in all actually these steaks could have easily been split up into four meals or at least shared with other friends…. however I just ate it all myself in two sittings. I mean, come on, how often does a starving artist get to enjoy himself like this? But I tell ya, now that I’ve done this once, I can’t wait to do it again with a group of friends. Especially those sandwiches.

One More Idea!!

So after I had already eaten the tuna as displayed in these two posts, I came up with another idea. If making sandwiches isn’t quite up your alley or you want to impress a dinner party with an amazing starter, try some ahi tuna lettuce wraps. Take your seared ahi steak (completely cooled) and mince it. Yes, chop it up really small. Place it in a bowl and toss with a pinch of kosher salt and a dash of sesame oil. Seal the bowl air tight and put it in the coldest part of your fridge for at least an hour. Meanwhile, get a head or two of iceburg lettuce, chop it in half, hollow it out so you’re left with a few layers of the big outside leaves (use what you removed for a salad later). Spice up 1/2 cup of soy sauce (or Bragg’s Liquid Aminos) with 1 tsp of prepared Wasabi in a tube (or powder, which ever your prefer). When you’re ready to eat, serve the ahi tuna in a bowl, super cold, with the lettuce leaves, spicy soy sauce, sesame seeds, and lemon on the side. Place about two tablespoons of the tuna in one of the lettuce leaves, top with the soy and the sesame seeds – an amazingly cool summer starter. Or, eat with some seaweed salad and miso soup from your favorite local sushi place for a light dinner. You will be so happy.

Also, if you’re feeling brave and/or you happen to get your hands on fresh Sushi grade tuna, skip the searing altogether and use completely raw tuna for this application. It’s amazing.

Hooray for pay day!

Pay Day Ahi

Ahi Avocado SandwichI know it’s common practice to associate “starving artist” with poverty. And rightfully so – I mean, they call it “starving” for a reason. This is no different for me, though, as you can see in this blog I am never *really* starving. And that’s because much of my life is spent being creatively frugal with what I find. But one of the things I love most about being a starving artist is that, every now and then, all the hard work and struggle pay off. The stars align, the paychecks roll in, and suddenly you find yourself with a bit of extra cash to spend. It’s a wonderful feeling. What’s even more wonderful is when you have enough cash to catch up on your bills and still have a bit left over to treat yourself to some divine cuisine.

July has found me in this very position and true to form, I have wasted no time in making a higher end food investment. Those of you who are loyal readers should be not at all surprised to find that it is seafood. One of my best friends, whether I’m rich or poor, is Costco, and one of the things that I’ve always looked longingly at is their fresh seafood counter. A bargain, yes, but still an initial investment beyond my normal budget… until a few days ago. I made two purchases. A beautiful large whole filet of wild caught sockeye salmon for $35. And a pack of two sizable fresh wild ahi tuna steaks for $20. Honestly, considering the purchase, these prices are a steal. Hefty, but not so much that I’m going to be totally broke and have nothing to do with it. And, what’s better, because there is so much, that means I have lots more to play with. Bargain AND multitasker? The starving artist’s dream.

For this post I’m focusing on the ahi. First, because I saw no point in freezing this gorgeous fish for later use, I decided instead to cook it right away and use it over the next few days in various ways. Cooking ahi is best kept simple – super super high heat, brush with a thin layer of olive oil, sear for two minutes on each side, done. No seasoning  (that comes later), no fuss, nice rare tuna with an even sear layer on all sides. Gorgeous.

Tonight I was inspired to make a sandwich. It turned out to be one of the best things ever created. The key? Simplicity. Above you see the fruits of my labor: seared ahi tuna sandwich with avocado and wasabi spread. Are you freaking out? You should be. Here’s the run down.

  • 2 slices of toasted Ezekiel bread (it’s flourless and low glycemic – try it)
  • 3 slices of ahi, cut against the grain, seasoned with kosher salt
  • sliced avocado, seasoned with kosher salt
  • 4-6 paper thin slices of cucumber (shave it with your vegetable peeler or use a food processor)
  • wasabi spread (1 tbs soy free veganaise, 1 tsp prepared wasabi, few drops soy sauce or Bragg’s Liquid Aminos, mix all ingredients thoroughly)

And that’s all there is, friends. Toast the bread, cover both slices with generous amounts of wasabi spread, layer on the tuna, the avocado, then the cucumber. Simple, elegant, and utterly divine. I won’t lie, I ate two of these, and also gave one to my roommate. It was so good that I felt he needed to experience it. And the best part? I still have another tuna steak!